The Mid-term Evaluation Meeting of RDI Projects, Cyprus 8 May 2018

The purpose of the mid-term review meeting was to present the current development of the funded projects and provide the opportunity to the Project Coordinators and the Follow-up Group members to exchange ideas and feedback. The discussions/networking after each session of project presentations allowed to foster coordination and future collaboration among all the projects.

 

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Presentation of WaterWorks2014 Cofunded projects results 

ACWAPUR: Accelerated water purification during artificial recharge of aquifers - a tool to restore drinking water resources
BIORG4WasteWaterVal+: Bioorganic novel approaches for food processing waste water treatment and valorisation: Lupanine case study
DESERT: Low-cost water DEsalination and SEnsoR Technology compact module
DOMINO: Dikes and Debris Flows Monitoring by Novel Optical Fiber Sensors
IMDROFLOOD: Improving Drought and Flood Early Warning, Forecasting and Mitigation using real-time hydroclimatic indicators
INXCES: INnovations for eXtreme Climatic EventS
IRIDA: Innovative remote and ground sensors, data and tools into a decision support system for agriculture water management
MEPROWARE: Novel methodology for the promotion of treated wastewater reuse for Mediterranean crops improvement
MUFFIN: Multi-scale urban flood forecasting: from local Tailored systems to a pan-European service
PIONEER STP: The Potential of Innovative Technologies to Improve Sustainability of Sewage Treatment Plants
PROGNOS: predicting in-lake responses to change using near real time models
SIM: smart irrigation from soil moisture forecast using Satellite and hydro meteo modelling
STEEPSTREAMS: Solid Transport Evaluation and Efficiency in Prevention: Sustainable Techniques of Rational Engineering and Advanced Methods
THERBIOR: THermal Energy Recovery from a novel sequencing batch BIOfilter granular Reactor
WATINTECH: Smart decentralized water management through a dynamic integration of technologies
WENEED: WatEr NEEDs, availability, quality and sustainability

 

INXCES - INnnovations for eXtreme Climatic Events

Project Interactive Website

 Muthanna

Coordinator 
Tone Merete Muyhanna

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, NTNU

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Projects  Partner and Institution:

Tone Merete Muthanna - Norwegian University of Science and Technology (Norway);
Maria Viklander, Lulea University of Technology (Sweden);
Guri Ganerød - Geological Survey of Norway (Norway);
Floris Cornelis Boogaard - Hanze University of Applied Science in Groningen (Netherland)
Radu Constantin Gogu - Technical University of Civil Engineering Bucharest (Romania)

Key word:


 Abstract:

INXCES - INnovations for eXtreme Climatic EventS
The main objectives of INXCES are: (1) development of innovative methods for risk assessment, (2) mitigation methods for extreme hydroclimatic events, (3) optimization of ecosystem services of the mitigation methods. It is widely acknowledged that extreme events such as floods and droughts are an increasing challenge, particularly in urban areas. The frequency and intensity of floods and droughts pose challenges for economic and social development, negatively affecting the quality of life of urban populations.
Prevention and mitigation of the consequences of hydroclimatic extreme events are dependent on the time scale. Floods are typically a consequence of intense rainfall events with short duration. In relation to prolonged droughts however, a much slower timescale needs to be considered, connected to groundwater level reductions, desiccation and negative consequences for growing conditions and potential ground – and building stability. INXCES will take a holistic spatial and temporal approach to the urban water balance at a catchment scale and perform technical-scientific research to assess, mitigate and build resilience in cities against extreme hydroclimatic events with nature-based solutions. INXCES will use and enhance innovative 3D terrain analysis and visualization technology coupled with state-of-the-art satellite remote sensing to develop cost-effective risk assessment tools for urban flooding, aquifer recharge, ground stability and subsidence. INXCES will develop quick scan tools that will help decision makers and other actors to improve the understanding of urban and peri-urban terrains and identify options for cost effective implementation of water management solutions that reduce the negative impacts of extreme events, maximize beneficial uses of rainwater and stormwater for small to intermediate events and provide long-term resilience in light of future climate changes. The INXCES approach optimizes the multiple benefits of urban ecosystems, thereby stimulating widespread implementation of nature-based solutions on the urban catchment scale.


Implementation:

WP1 Integrated Risk Assessment; WP2 Sub & Surface Water Management; WP3 Tech Innovations for Risk Assessment & Mitigation;WP4 Dissemination/Outreach; WP5 Project Management

Outcome/deliverables:  

Improved environmental impact alleviation of climatic events. A holistic approach to the urban water balance and improved management of urban water resources. A new urban monitoring station and shallow subsurface monitoring
in Bucharest and Better prediction of changes in groundwater level Incorporating rain-on-snow and snowmelt events in flood risk
assessment Prototype of nature-based water quality filters and treatment train Guidelines for improved design of stormwater systems for extremes.

References coordinator and  leaders of  each WP:

Maria Viklander, Guri Ganerød, Tone Merete Muthanna, Floris Cornelis Boogaard, Radu Constantin Gogu


Contact Point for  Communication/Dissemination activities:

Floris Cornelis Boogaard


Contact Point for Open Data/Open Access activities:


 Picture of the research team:

Water4ever

Optimizing water use in agriculture to preserve soil and water resources

Project Interactive Website

 

Coordinator 

IST, All partners involved


 Executive Coordinator 

Projects  Partner and Institution:

IST
Deimos (PT)
INESCTEC (PT)
IsardSAT (SP)
UPCT (SP)
IMAMOTER (I)
AIBU (TR)

Implementation:

WP 1 Management - Coordinator IST, All partners involved
WP 2 In situ measurement technologies - Coordinator - INESC TEC, UPC
WP 3 Remote Sensing - Coordinator – Deimos; Other participants: isardSAT
WP 4 Moddeling - Coordinator: AIB University , all other partners;
WP 5 Case Studies - Coordinator – IMAMOTER ; all partners involve
WP 6 Dissemination - UPCT, all partners involved

Outcome/deliverables

To combine EO, in situ measuring, hydrological models and crop models to develop operational tools to:

  1. Support Regulated Deficit Irrigation;
  2. Assess the benefits for hydrological resources at the catchment scale

Expected Impact of the Project:
Increase RDI knowledge, Irrigation water saving still improving crop productivity and quality, Quantitative link between, plot and catchment scale, Technological development on sensors, image processing and modelling, Bridging between disciplines and players (Universities, Institutes, Companies)

AgWIT - Agricultural Water Innovations in the Tropics

Project Interactive Website

 

Coordinator 

LuMark S. Johnson - University of British Columbia (UBC)


 Executive Coordinator 

Projects  Partner and Institution:

Susan Trumbore Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry BMEL Germany
Paulo Brando Instituto de Pesquisa Ambiental da Amazônia IDRC Brazil
Andrea Suárez Serrano Universidad Nacional de Costa Rica - HIDROCEC - IDRC Costa Rica

Monica García Technical University of Denmark (DTU) IFD Denmark
Steve Lyon Stockholm University - FORMAS Sweden
Chih Hsin Cheng National Taiwan University MOST - Taiwan

Key words


Abstract:

OBJECTIVES:

  1. Identify improvements in resource use efficiencies and environmental performance of key crops produced via alternative water and soil management strategies under rainfed and irrigated conditions;
  2. Determine crop physiological responses of biochar additions to soil using non -destructive optical and thermal sensing at multiple cales throughout > 20 agricultural crop development cycles;
  3. Develop/apply crop ecophysiological, hydrological, and biogeochemical models to evaluate innovative soil and water management strategies in relation to the plant - soil -atmosphere system;
  4. Evaluate and set priorities among strategies to increase water resilience through structured decision making workshops with local communities, producer groups and water management agencies.

Project structure

WP1. Crop responses, water and carbon footprints in relation to biochar additions and water management strategies Annual volumetric water footprints (blue and green) fo r soy, corn, rice, melon, and sugarcane;
WP2. Hydrology, isotopic measurements and modelling at nested scales;
WP3. Structured Decision Making Workshops and Knowledge Transfer;


Implementation:

Outcome/deliverables

Expected Impact of the Project, Develop and assess strategies to improve agricultural resilience while reducing the water, carbon and other footprints of agricultural practices and improving freshwater security and environmental conditions AgWIT will develop practicable strategies with end users and stakeholders for integrating novel approaches to soil and water management of agricultural systems.

References coordinator and  leaders of  each WP


Contact Point for  Communication/Dissemination activities:


Contact Point for Open Data/Open Access activities: 


Picture of the research team: 

IMPASSE – Impacts of MicroPlastics on AgrosystemS and Stream Environments

Project Interactive Website

 Foto Luca Nizzetto

Coordinator 

Luca Nizzetto


 Executive Coordinator 

Projects  Partner and Institution:

Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA) (Norway)
Swedish University of Agriculture (SLU) (Sweden)
Trent University (Canada)
Winsor University (Canada)
Vrije University Amsterdam (The Netherlands)
IMDEA Water (Spain)

Key words

Microplastics, Ecotoxicology, Fate and distribution model, Agriculture, water management

Abstract:

While it is widely known that microplastics (MPs) in the ocean are a serious environmental problem, the threat posed by MPs in agricultural lands is almost entirely unknown. A large fraction of MPs produced in industrialized countries is intercepted by sewers. In treatment plants most of MPs are retained in the sludge. A sizeable fraction of this sewage sludge is spread in many countries on agricultural lands. We estimate the MP input to agricultural lands in Europe to be between 50000 and 175000 tonnes/year. This is especially alarming given that plastic polymers can contain toxic compounds and endocrine disrupting substances. Effectively, sewage sludge application may be causing persistent, pernicious and almost totally ignored contamination of agricultural land. In IMPASSE, we propose to develop and communicate new understanding of MP behavior in agrosystems which is urgently needed to avoid the potential of serious and long lasting environmental contamination. The highly interdisciplinary project includes risk communication, stakeholder engagement, ecotoxicology, catchment modelling, decision support tools, monitoring and experimental work needed to understand and then minimize threats associated with MPs in agrosystems.

IMPASSE will contribute substantially to an avoidance of current and future pollution in soils and waters in agricultural landscapes and develop guidance on how drainage management may influence MP mobility.

Project structure

WPO Project management

Implementation

The research work plan is framed around 2 Pillars: Pillar 1 (including WP1-3) is devoted to analysis of exposure and impacts of MPs in agrosystems. In Pillar 2, instead, this information is used to assess environmental and economic impacts of possible management actions interactively elaborated/discussed with the stakeholder group (including farming organizations, water utilities, catchment authorities and governance). The development of Decision support tools (WP3) is a central aspect of IMPASSE. In particular we will complete the development of the first mathematical model of MP transport conceived to serve as a powerful upscaling tool. We will develop a tool that will enable addressing pertinent questions for stakeholders, regulators, farmers and the general public such as: Will the burden of MPs increase in the future, under current agricultural practices? Does/will this burden exceed safety thresholds for organisms and agricultural sustainability? What would be the farmed soil recovery time if the addition of MPs is ceased? How efficiently are MPs which runoff from fields, retained in stream sediments? What are the implications for the freshwater ecosystem? Will mitigation/remediation actions result in co-occurring adverse impacts on farmed soils and water quality (e.g. increased nutrient/organic matter run-off)? What will it cost to address these problems? Scientifically rigorous guidance for answering these questions will be generated starting from INCA-Microplastics (INCA-MP), the unique model prototype (the first of this kind) developed by our group. INCA-MP is an integrated hydro-biogeochemical contaminant fate model. After calibration and validation using experiments and observations conducted in artificial streams and field scale (WP1 and WP3), the model will be used to describe 3 experimental case studies in Sweden, Spain and Canada, and provide information on implications of the various management scenario.


In order to obtain the necessary information to calibrate and assess the model we conceived the activities in WP1 (exposure). These include the first analysis of MP inputs, accumulation and releases from farmed fields treated with wastewater and sludge.
WP2 (Impacts) is dedicated to the assessment of the uptake and toxic responses of organisms to MP exposure. This WP is conceived to fill the current knowledge gap on the effects of MPs on soil and freshwater organisms. Experiments will be conducted at different levels of complexity (from single species to communities) addressing combined toxic outcomes related to addition of MPs and selected chemicals that can be constituent of the original plastic or adsorbed via secondary exposure in the environment. A key component of our research will be the analysis of transfers of hazardous substances contained in plastic polymers (e.g. plasticizers, flame retardants and their metabolites) from MPs in soil to food products. To this end we will analyze concentrations of a selected set of substances in crops (e.g. vegetables) and cow milk, and compare results with control groups. This activity bridges environmental and human health fields.


The knowledge and tools developed in Pillar 1 (WP1-3) will be used in Pillar 2 for conveying information to the stakeholder group. The group will include representative of farmers, water utilities and governance from each of the selected 3 case studies. The case studies will be selected to represent farming catchments in which sewage and/or waste water are used as fertilizer or for irrigation. Through a tailored communication we will involve stakeholders in elaborating suggestions for possible mitigation measures. The implication of the suggested management scenarios will be analyzed under an environmental lens (using INCA-MPs) and with the new information on effects (WP2)) and an economic lens (through an original analysis of cost-benefits, co-benefits and trade-offs). WP4 and WP5 are linked by a loop representing the interactive mechanisms underpinning stakeholders’ involvement in our project. This mechanism, fully meeting the joint call requirements, is of great importance and great added value.

Outcome/deliverables

D1.1. Complete dataset of MP fluxes and loading for the 3 case studies (electronic spreadsheet);
D1.2. Complete dataset of MP mass budgets in artificial stream experiments (electronic spreadsheet);
D1.3. Report on exposure analysis results for stakeholders (Report);
D1.4. Two scientific publications on fluxes and budgets of MPs in agrosystems.
D2.1. Report on single species effects;
D2.2. Scientific article on the results of task T2.3;
D2.3. Report on higher tier effects to be delivered to stakeholders;
D2.4. Report on bioaccumulation and biomagnification to be delivered to stakeholders
D3.1 Calibrated INCA-MP model applications with uncertainty assessments simulating MP fate and transport in three case study catchments;
D3.2 Establishment of the knowledge base required to understand present day MP pollutant dynamics and possible future consequences of changes in climate, land management and MP loading (Scientific paper submitted)
D4.1 Eight National Stakeholder Meeting reports;
D4.2 A media report specifically targeted to address (likely) shortcomings in awareness of MP issues in the environment;
D4.3 Four management scenario workshops reports;
D4.4 International seminar report presenting results of management scenario description.
D5.1 Identification of the most environmentally efficient strategies of MP management which minimize transport to receiving waters (Scientific paper );
D5.2 Identification and promulgation of the costs and economic effectiveness of MP management strategies which limit in-situ and downstream runoff of MPs (Report);
D5.3 A synthesis report designed for stakeholders documenting the resilient MP management strategies and their implications.


Deliverables:

D1.1: Data sources and indicators finalized (month 12).

D1.2: Finalized architecture deployment (month 24).

D2.1: Generalized data mining techniques and anomaly algorithm & indicator (month 12)

D2.2: Maps indicating hotspots, vulnerability and identified “hot time periods” (month 14)

D2.3: Generalized data-driven modelling techniques (month 20)

D4.1: Derived climate change scenarios for drivers/predictors at relevant scales (month 18).

D4.2: Deployed Big Data framework (month 20).

D4.3: Simulated defined seasonal and long term scenarios and analysed the impacts (month 22).

D4.4: Derived key indicators (month 24).
D5.1: Set-up website (month 1).
D5.2: Extracted list of most urgent needs and collected data from stakeholders (month 6).

References coordinator and  leaders of  each WP:

WP0 (Coordination): Luca Nizzetto, NIVA
WP1: Luca Nizzetto NIVA
WP2: Marco Vighi IMDEA Water
WP3: Martyn Futter, SLU
WP4: SIndre Langaas, NIVA
WP5: Jill Crossman, Windsor University


Contact Point for  Communication/Dissemination activities:

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (NIVA)


 Contact Point for Open Data/Open Access activities: 

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (NIVA)


 Picture of the research team: 

Updating the Water JPI SRIA

We are currently updating the Water JPI Strategic Research and innovation Agenda (SRIA 2.0) and we need your input. To submit your proposed Research and Development Needs/Gaps to the SRIA, please complete the Online Template available here

For background information:

WWater JPI SRIA 2.0ater JPI SRIA 2.0

This publication sets out specific RDI priorities or areas where RDI measures are highly recommended within five main themes. It will be implemented during the period 2016-2019.

   

An introduction Water JPI SRIA

An Introduction to the Water JPI SRIA

Short version of the Water JPI Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda.
Read more about the identified research priorities for the future.

  

Water JPI key achievements 2011-2016

This publication presents the ten main goals achieved by the initiative till now.

 

 

Open Data & Open Access
Water JPI Interface

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Calendar

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